hear

hearhear
Did you hear that?
No, I didn’t hear anything.
I heard a knock on the door.

hear |hi(ə)r| verb
(past and past participle heard |hərd| ) [ with obj. ] perceive with the ear the sound made by (someone or something): behind her she could hear men’s voices | [ with obj. and infinitive ] : she had never been heard to complain | [ no obj. ] : he did not hear very well.

• be told or informed of: have you heard the news? | [ with clause ] : they heard that I had moved | [ no obj. ] : I was shocked to hear ofher death.

• [ no obj. ] (have heard of) be aware of; know of the existence of: nobody had ever heard of my college.

ORIGIN
Old English hīeran, hēran, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hooren and German hören .

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listen

listen

I listen to a lot of music.
Last night I listened to some new albums.
What are you listening to?

listen
|ˈlisən| verb [ no obj. ]
give one’s attention to a sound: evidently he was not listening | sit and listen to the radio.

• take notice of and act on what someone says; respond to advice or a request: I told her over and over again, but she wouldn’t listen.

• make an effort to hear something; be alert and ready to hear something: they listened for sounds from the baby’s room.

ORIGIN
Old English hlysnan‘pay attention to,’ of Germanic origin.

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circle

circle

noun:
The dogs made a circle around me.

verb:
The dogs circled around me.
The dogs were circling him.
I don’t like it when my dogs circle around me.

circle |ˈsərkəl| (abbr.: cir. or circ.) noun
1 a round plane figure whose boundary (the circumference) consists of points equidistant from a fixed point (the center).

• something in the shape of a circle: the lamp spread a circle of light | they all sat around in a circle.
• a dark circular mark below each eye, typically caused by illness or tiredness.• a curved upper tier of seats in a theater. See also dress circle.

verb [ with obj. ] move all the way around (someone or something), esp. more than once: the two dogs circle each other with hackles raised | [ no obj. ] : we circled around the island.
• [ no obj. ] (circle back) move in a wide loop back toward one’s starting point.

• form a ring around: the monastery was circled by a huge wall.

• draw a line around: circle the correct answers.

ORIGIN
Old English, from Old French cercle, from Latin circulus ‘small ring,’ diminutive of circus ‘ring.’

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brush

brush

hairbrush |ˈhe(ə)rˌbrəSH| noun
a brush for arranging or smoothing a person’s hair.

Noun:
Have you seen my brush?
I got a new hairbrush yesterday.

Verb:
I brush my hair about four or five times a day.
How often do you brush your hair?
I brushed my hair a few minutes ago.

brush 1 |brəSH| noun
1 an implement with a handle, consisting of bristles, hair, or wire set into a block, used for cleaning or scrubbing, applying a liquid or powder to a surface, arranging the hair, or other purposes: a paint brush.

• an act of sweeping, applying, or arranging with a brush or with one’s hand: he gave the seat a brush.

verb [ with obj. ] remove (dust or dirt) by sweeping or scrubbing: we’ll be able to brush the mud offeasily | he brushed himself down.

• use a brush or one’s hand to remove dust or dirt from (something): she brushed downher best coat.

• clean (one’s teeth) by scrubbing with a brush.• arrange (one’s hair) by running a brush through it.

ORIGIN Middle English: from Old French broce, perhaps based on Latin bruscum, denoting an excrescence on the maple.

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comb

comb

Noun
Is that my comb?
I put my comb near the sink.

Verb:
You should comb your hair before the meeting.
How often do you comb your hair?
I combed my hair this morning.
I’m going to comb my hair in a minute.

comb |kōm| noun
1 a strip of plastic, metal, or wood with a row of narrow teeth, used for untangling or arranging the hair.

• [ in sing. ] an instance of untangling or arranging the hair with a comb: she gave her hair a comb.

• a short curved type of comb, worn by women to hold hair in place or as an ornament.

verb [ with obj. ]
1 untangle or arrange (the hair) by drawing a comb through it: (as adj. combed) : neatly combed hair.

• (comb something out) remove something from the hair by drawing a comb through it: she combed the burrs out of the dog’s coat.

ORIGIN
Old English camb, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch kam and German Kamm .

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Happy New Year

year of the horse

As per my usual, this year’s New Year’s card shows the Chinese new year animal. This year, 2014 is the year of the horse! Pretty sweet.

I actually completely missed New Years this year as I was on an airplane passing through time zones. Flying from Florida to Tokyo has a way of screwing with your sense of time especially on New Year’s. We ended up with sunlight the entire time and never seemed to have midnight at all.

Here’s hoping you have a great new year and a great year of the horse!

 

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Zombie Kid’s Book

Zombie Kids' Book

Giler and Saru’s Zombies
One Halloween night while reading spooky stories, Giler and Saru hear a strange noise. Saru is sure it must be zombies, but Giler’s never even heard of them before. He quickly gets a crash course in what zombies are and how to be prepared in case they attack. 

Best read in a funny voice this e-book is filled with loads of gross, stinky monsters and two good friends willing to do anything to make it to the dawn.

If you’ve already looked around my zombie blog, Surviving the Dead, you know how much I love Halloween and the undead. This book is a BIT of a break from my usual illustrations in that I toned down some of the splattery guts and gore to focus a bit more on the fun sloppy gross-out that kids would like.

As a new parent, making the book I always asked myself if it was something I would want my son to read and thought a great deal about how I would read it with him. Fortunately he’s only a baby so I have a bit of time before he understands what sort of monsters zombies really are. But I can’t wait till the day when we can read it together, in a goofy voice, with silly scary noises ploping and bloping and blatting all throughout the story.

Get a look at the book in iTunes simply by clicking here.

Or pick it up in PDF form by clicking here.

zombie types
stinkers
bruisers
zombie kids book page

 

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Zombies

I took some time away from My English Images this summer to work on a kids’ book project I’d had in the planning stages for several years. Back in 2010 I was in a group show as part of the Society of Children’s Books Authors and Illustrators where I showed several test images of a story idea I was batting around about zombies.

zombies

I let that idea stew for a while until about a year later I did the pencils and inks on an updated version of my main draft. Unhappy with my colors though I took about another year to get a bit better and finally, this summer, made the big push.

Giler and Saru’s Zombies. 

One Halloween night while reading spooky stories, Giler and Saru hear a strange noise. Saru is sure it must be zombies, but Giler’s never even heard of them before. He quickly gets a crash course in what zombies are and how to be prepared in case they attack.

Best read in a funny voice this e-book is filled with loads of gross, stinky monsters and two good friends willing to do anything to make it to the dawn.

This is my first foray into the world of children’s literature and perfect for the Halloween season.

Want to know more?
Check it out here and get your copy today and I’ll have a copy coming to an iTunes store near you very soon!

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